Quartzite Countertops That Look Like Marble

5 Quartzite Countertops That Look Like Marble

Want the look of marble but without the hassle? These 5 quartzite's are exactly what you're looking for.

More and more homeowners are looking for countertops that look like marble but that perform more like a harder stone. Plenty of homeowners and interior designers are opting for natural stones like quartzite, and thanks to a wide variety of color options you can find great stones without sacrificing sturdiness. Here are 5 that look so much like marble, you won’t be able to tell the difference.

On the fence about quartzite? Here’s our huge guide that includes 7 reasons why more designers are turning to it every day.

White Fantasy

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Sometimes referred to as ‘Super White’, White Fantasy is one of the most commonly sought after quartzites for people who want durability but with the soft, ephemeral beauty of marble. It has a soft white base with distinctive grey veining that creates a stunning effect in any kitchen or bathroom. It wont etch and will hold its own in any busy kitchen.

Caution – Marble is often mistakenly labeled white fantasy or super white and sold as quartzite. It’s extremely important to do an etch and scratch test if you’re thinking about buying one of these.

Its look is often described as ‘arctic’ or serene and it may be called one of several different names, but they are all essentially the same and vary mostly depending on the amount of veining in the stone.

White Princess

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You may see this referred to as Princess White, depending on the vendor, but however it’s listed, it’s is a great choice. It’s one of the closest styles to marble in regards to the soft white and grey tones. The veins in this quartzite are less pronounced and a little on the ‘fuzzy’ side, but the gentle grey and white coloring make it a soothing choice for kitchens or bathrooms.

Related: Wondering how much these new kitchen work surfaces will cost you? Here’s what you need to know.

It only looks delicate–it’s tough like granite but has a soft aesthetic that practically invites you to touch it, much like Carrera.

White Macaubas

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If you want a creamier stone with more color variation, take a look at White Macaubas. It is a creamy sort of white and sometimes has pronounced green and grey veining. You’ll find it listed as Bianco Macaubas’ and ‘Lune de Luce’, among other names, and it is one of the most popular marble imposters because of its character and durability. Macaubas is considered to be a ‘hard’ quartzite, meaning it is similar to granite in its hardness and durability.

Despite its tough structure, it also has the delicate beauty you’re looking for. It’s one of the most popular choices for kitchens because of its durability and gentle beauty.

Taj Mahal

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If wispy and dramatic is the look you’re going for, Taj Mahal brings it en masse. A slab of this gorgeous quartzite features a creamy background of off-white or soft white with pale gold and brown veining. It looks remarkably like marble, but is extremely durable. Many people choose it for more than just countertops–it makes a dramatic accent for walls or backsplash for sinks and stoves. It’s also popular for floors and kitchen islands as well as bathrooms.

Related: Let’s Dig Deep And See If Quartzite Is A Better Option Than Granite

With such an exotic name, there is one drawback. Because of its popularity, Taj Mahal can be more expensive, but its long-lasting beauty make it a worthwhile investment.

Calacatta Macaubas

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This quartzite is similar to White Macaubas but it has darker and more pronounced veining. It still has the creamy whiteness, but the darker veins contrast beautifully to give it the look of Calacatta Marble. The cool, creamy coloring is popular for kitchens and offers the strength of granite. The smoky finish is great for kitchen and bathroom countertops, floors, backsplash designs, and walls. It’s got plenty of character for less cost than actual marble, and it can handle a lot more abuse, too.

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